Suicide Bereavement Support Group

May 2, 2012

Lifeline Northern Beaches situated at Balgowlah on Sydney’ northern beaches  conducts suicide bereavement support groups. These groups are open to adults who have experienced the loss of a loved one by suicide. The group meets on the first Tuesday evening of each month, 7 pm to 9 pm. If you are interested or know someone who would benefit please contact Lifeline Northern Beaches on 02 9949 5522 for more information.

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Suicide Bereavement Support Group

March 10, 2011

Lifeline Northern Beaches situated at Balgowlah on Sydney’ northern beaches from time to time conducts suicide bereavement support groups. These groups are open to adults who have experienced the loss of a loved one by suicide. The next group begins on Monday 28th March for 8 sessions. If you are interested or know someone who would benefit please contact Lifeline Northern Beaches on 02 9949 5522 for more information.

No Way to Behave at a Funeral-comments from readers

November 8, 2010

“I’ve just read your book and it is very impressive. You are a gifted writer. Your book is deeply personal and honest. Like a narrative poem of love and longing.”- Brenda

“Your book is a wonderful piece of writing and a very important book. It was quite an honour to read it.” – Sally

“Noel, you have a rare gift for artculating feelings and emotions and display great bravery in laying bare your most personal thoughts.” – Mike

“I loved hearing your story, thank you. I know a number of men who would appreciate hearing your story. There are a lot of resources available for women, but not much that is specific to the journey of  a man. A big thank you for your honesty about sex. A big issue that is so often ignored by our books, articles. We are left to answer those questions on our own. Not easy.” – Michael

No Way to Behave at a Funeral-a review

April 27, 2010

This book is an intensely personal account of the author’s journey after the death of his beloved wife, Maris.

Noel Braun bares it all in these pages. Grief and loss are as much a part of life as birth and love- we all will endure these at some time in our lives. So this book can be a comfort to others facing the loss of a loved one.

The author’s pain is raw, more so because his wife died by suicide after suffering many years of depression. He felt not only tremendous grief, but tremendous guilt that he could not have prevented his wife’s death.

The author has been brutally honest in this account of his life as a widower. This book is well written, and, as the author says, it is a love story first and foremost.

Wendy O’Hanlon     Cick-A Cultural Connection

Depression

April 16, 2010

I witnessed Maris’ daily struggle with depression. Early morning was the worst. I’d wake, look across and see her, eyes wide open, staring at the ceiling, mustering the courage to face the day. One day I glanced across as usual and this poem came to me. I grabbed a scrap of paper before I lost it.

Her eyes are open

But she cannot see

Beyond the black veil

Drawn across her world.

She longs for the bright sun

To shine upon her earth

And banish the bleak dark shadows.

She longs for the gentle breeze

To lift the heavy curtain

That hides the good things in her life

But all she can feel

Are bleak cold winds

That chill her to the soul.

Maris found the scrap and wept. It described her situation exactly. She thought I had copied the lines from a book. I knew where she was at. I was doing my best to accompany my wife, to support on her terrible journey.

Extract from: No Way to behave at a Funeral.

No Way to Behave at a Funeral

April 16, 2010

I have just published a new book. Entitled No Way to behave at a Funeral, it is a memoir of my journey following the death by suicide of my wife Maris after years of suffering depression. The comments on the back cover are as follows:

The abrupt ending of a life by suicide can be the most catastrophic of events for those left behind. Survivors experience intense pain and massive guilt. Guilt banishes survivors to a place so removed from the normal hurley-burly of everyday life that they feel close to madness. Somehow they have to claw their way back.

Noel accepted that there was no way around his anguish and met suffering head on. His pain allowed him to discover the richness with him and to grow in wisdom which he hopes might be of benefit to others.

Maris’ death did not shut her out of Noel’s life. She remains a very real presence. This is a love story with a difference.